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Black and White Photography, New York: Thursday, January 06, 2005


Curb 83rd

8:27:11 PM    

That's one thing about digital that I like: you can do quick experiments, just to see how things are going to look, without all the waiting for film development and prints.  This afternoon, I did some experiments shooting 360 degrees around various objects in the street.  Take them back to the shop, weld them together, and you quickly see what you can do.  These are just sketches, so to speak, so for now I'm not taking the trouble to post them.

5:51:51 PM    


Curb on 83rd

11:17:37 AM    

Main problem - if you want to do this type of assemblage photography is not to:

a) get hit by a car while you are stooped to get some small detail of the asphalt and

b) don't get picked up by Bellvue.

I have been asked if I work for:

a) The Dept. of Transportation

b) The Highway Dept.

c) The 2nd avenue survey team.

Also, it helps to block out other interesting things you may see, and at least for the first picture or so, try to stick to the original plan you had. It is very easy to go off into more surreal realms. That might be for another collection.

As far as my influences for this type of technique - honestly I was just thinking about some way to get a more personal feel for what was going on inside the frame; how to get rhythms and forms, the ideas coming from music and poetry (A-A-B-A; ABAB etc.). And a NOVA episode I once saw about how they were doing photography from a plane in Alaska, and comparing the timber line from photographs that the military had taken 30 years ago, with current photographs of the timber line. There was a scene in a room where they were trying to piece thousands of physical prints together.

Because of the various ways of overlapping photographs with Photoshop, I thought you could do something inventive. What I also found intriguing was that you could get a vantage point of something pretty ordinary that you couldn't get otherwise. And if you want to get fancy, you can mix in pieces and photographic techniques that don't all fit together that well. As an example, you could start the print at one angle, and end it at another.

9:48:55 AM    


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