May 2004
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
            1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 31          
Apr   Jun

Previous / Next


E-MAIL


 3/3/05
 3/3/05
 3/3/05
 3/2/05
 3/2/05
 3/1/05
 3/1/05
 3/1/05
 3/1/05
 2/28/05
 2/28/05
 2/28/05
 2/28/05
 2/27/05
 2/27/05
 2/27/05
 2/27/05
 2/26/05
 2/26/05
 2/25/05
 2/25/05


Black and White Photography, New York: Sunday, May 16, 2004

Second day on the street.  More learning.  Another sub-culture.  Many of the sellers of photographs are Tibetan.  Don't know why, but they are the ones who are selling mostly purloined photographs - things that have been scanned from some book and then mass-produced.  The frames, the mats, and the materials are very cheap.  The subjects are landmarks.  And they sell a tremendous lot of these.

I sold the same amount - 8 small prints as on Friday.  It was a good Sunday crowd, and although a lot of people came by my display and told me how beautiful the prints were, they then turned to the shlock guy across from me and bought his stuff. 

There definitely is a very small percentage of somewhat cultured buyers who come by - but I believe they want larger prints.  Tomorrow the museum is closed and Tuesday I am going to do some more shooting of a play - but I'm going to spend the next few days figuring out how to get some large prints out there without breaking my back.  For now, I'll probably just go with a canvas thing for people to flip through.

One of the nice things is how kind vendors are towards each other.  Whether they are selling junk, whether they are selling original material -- there is a genuine bond there and it was easy to find and make friends there.  Lots of joking around about the customers. The favorite tale is always about the customer who spends a long time talking about the pictures without buying something.  This is the bane of the vendors existence.

The other story always centers around a spouse who talk their mate out of buying something.  That almost happened to me twice today.

9:11:50 PM    

Consulted with NASA on my carry design and they advised me to put everything into a large backpack - 86 the cart.  This was a brilliant idea (in theory) since a) won't have to drag the cart up the stairs later and b) I think the stuff will fit into a cab if I can find one.

I bought some small clips to put prints around the top of the display and I'm definitely going out there again today (Sunday).

"stay away from the aluminum foil!!!  i know it's a beckerman tradition to wrap things (tv antennnas, tuna fish sandwiches, pavlov's salivating dog) in aluminum foil, but for god's sake stay away from the foil!" GR - friend from 2nd Grade P.S. 104

I'm not doing the aluminum foil thing - I decided that I would hang some wind chimes from the display - noise, sparkle etc.  Don't have them yet.  When I was in 2nd grade, I made a dog out of paper mache with a tube running through it to illustrate Pavlov's principle: I would ring a bell and squeeze a bulb filled with water and the dog would salivate - or spritz out of its mouth.  (The beginning of inkjet printing).

Or, paint the whole thing red white and blue and drape an American flag over everything - okay, I won't go there at this point in our history.

I still need to figure out a couple of things - how to get a couple of larger prints out there and how to setup some small flip through display.  I want to make a little contraption that folds out of cardboard - essentially a cardboard box, but it fold flat to fit into backpack and then opens to hold small prints for flipping through.

Not exactly rocket science this...

Speaking of NASA, they said they were working on a stair-climbing contraption but it would take 15 years to develop, 25 million dollars and the first few prototypes had blown up scattering art throughout the building.


 

5:27:05 AM    


Click here to visit the Radio UserLand website. © Copyright 2005 Dave Beckerman.
Last update: 3/3/2005; 12:42:45 PM. Click to see xml version of photo blog